Saturday, locals had an opportunity to learn about a lesser-known aspect of a local historical figure’s life

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NEWTON COUNTY — Saturday, locals had an opportunity to learn about a lesser-known aspect of a local historical figure’s life.

A demonstration was held at George Washington Carver National Monument to educate the public about the Jesup Agricultural Wagon.

The wagon was funded by Morris K, Jesup, a northerner.

George Washington Carver and members of the Tuskegee Institute would work with farmers who didn’t have access to the education, and on the wagon, they would bring seeds and bulletins Carver had written.

Although George Washington Carver is most well known for his work with peanuts, his work with farmers was critical for their survival.

Valerie Baldwin, Park Guide, says, “Cotton had removed all the nitrogen from the soil, so many farmers were starving because they couldn’t grow anything. So this was a way to show not only his

agricultural side, but his humanitarian side.”

The Jesup Wagon was originally horse-drawn, but it later became a truck with the help of technological advancements.

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