‘Fireball Event’ to blame for BOOM on Sunday

News

American Meteor Society maps out reports from observers of meteors, fireballs, comets...

(JOPLIN, Mo.) — A little after 5:00 PM Sunday we started getting messages and texts asking what that loud BOOM was across the region.

One of our Joplin News First followers, Sonny Mitchell, pointed us to the American Meteor Society. A person can log reported sightings of meteors or fireballs on their website. Click the link to log what you observed.

According to NASA we are in the Perseid Meteor Shower now. “Those in southern latitudes can look toward the northeast to see more meteors. The Perseid meteor shower will radiate out. The 2019 Perseids peak overnight on Aug. 12 and 13.”

#JLNtipsters were messaging us saying family and friends heard the boom at the same time 2-3 hours away from each other. In fact according to reports it was heard and seen from hundreds of miles apart in a short matter of seconds from Kansas City to Oklahoma City, and that covered Joplin.

Dan Skoff of KNWA is a meteorologist with our sister Nexstar Media stations in NWA, stated on his FB page Monday.

“GOES Geostationary Lightning Mapper (GLM) data confirmed a FLASH (flash density) w/ NO STORMS even close between 5:05pm to 5:06pm. Hi-res Meso Sect 1 visible Satellite data never showed a vapor trail, but there were quite a few high cirrus clouds.” 

“We received 16 reports about a fireball seen over Arkansas, Kansas Missouri, and Oklahoma on Sunday, August 11.”

American Meteor Society
'FIREBALL EVENT' to blame for loud boom across region Sunday

'FIREBALL EVENT' to blame for loud boom across region Sunday say observers CLICK for the storyhttps://www.fourstateshomepage.com/news/fireball-event-to-blame-for-boom-on-sunday/

Posted by Joplin News First on Monday, August 12, 2019

Skoff continued to show why it was a fireball, “You can also see the shockwave on the seismic activity. It shows up just before 5:11pm at the Hobbs State Park helicorder. This would make sense, if the meteor(ite) was in SW MO… it would have taken approx 4 minutes for the sound to travel 48 miles. (Every 5 seconds = approx 1 mile for the speed of sound,” Skoff notes on his facebook page. (THANKS @danskoff)

Copyright 2019 Nexstar Broadcasting, Inc. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.