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Recovering from Emotional Trauma

Recovering from the emotional toll of a traumatic event can be a tough process, involving weeks, months or even years of healing.
JOPLIN, MO---"It can be things from feelings of anxiousness to more physical: heart palpitations or muscle soreness or difficulty concentrating, sleeping, eating," says Vice President of Freeman Ozark Center Del Camp.

But regardless of the symptoms, that patient needs time to heal.  Camp says the amount of time will vary depending on the case.

"Probably the most important thing to remember is that the emotional reaction to trauma is generally speaking a normal response to an abnormal situation," he says.

It's also important to take care of yourself.  That means a nutritious diet, regular exercise and a full night's sleep.  And rely on the emotional support of your friends and family.

"It may be seeing if there's any way to reduce the amount of time you work for a short period of time it maybe that you spend more time with your kids, with your spouse," Camp says.

If you find your mind dwelling on the trauma, Camp says set an appointment with yourself.

"Say maybe I can put off a certain time each day I'm going to think about this.  If it comes to mind several times everday, just recognize that it came into mind and let it go.  And remind myself that I'm going to think about those things later on today at a certain time," he says.
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