Miami's Harbor Shelter Feed America Project

Miami's Harbor Shelter Feed America Project

The Harbor Shelter in Miami has distributed 13,000 pounds of food to those in need in only one month.
MIAMI, OK.--- Ruby Lynch has been living in low-income senior housing for nine years. She says although she has never gone hungry, there have been times where money was tight.

"There's been a lot of hard times. But like I said, you didn't always have what you wanted. I have more now than I had then, I'll put it that way," said Ruby Lynch, Miami Resident.

With help from Miami's Harbor Shelter and the Ministerial Alliance, people like Ruby can get fresh produce, baked goods, bread and other sustainable foods delivered to their doors.

"We have a lot of people here that, some less fortunate than others, that this is a real blessing. And everybody looks forward to it. They cram the room and, it's just a real blessing for us," said Lynch. 

The Harbor and the Alliance joined the Feed America Project earlier this year. The two groups distribute overstocked food from Wal-Mart and give to low-income and homeless residents in Miami. The program also allows the groups to give more food to those in need, without using the shelter's funds.

"We wouldn't have money to go buy, cakes and pastries. They give that to us. So there's boxes of cakes and pastries where they can eat in the morning with their coffee, and it's really a blessing," said Phil Shyers, The Harbor Director.

Shelter employees say many of the people they help often have to choose between paying for medical expenses or buying groceries. So, the Feed America Project ensures those who are having trouble paying for medicine, will at least have something substantial to eat. 

"To be able to give families something that would sustain them, you know, through a tough time, has really been a blessing," said Shyers. 

The Harbor Shelter has been busy keeping people fed, housing nearly double their maximum capacity over the past 30 days. They receive food from Wal-Mart three times a week to help make a dent in the number of Miami's under-served community. 
Page: [[$index + 1]]
comments powered by Disqus