Athletic Trainers Stress Heat Safety

Athletic Trainers Stress Heat Safety

Many high schools are preparing for their first football games of the season, but they're also trying to beat the heat.
CARL JUNCTION, MO.--- On one of the hottest days of the summer, the Carl Junction Bulldogs are still on a mission to be champions this football season. On the road to being number one, the team and their coaches must first beat the heat.

"We're taking extra precautions with making sure the kids are hydrated. It's very hot, it's very dry. There is some humidity in the air. Plenty of water, plenty of gatorade, plenty of water breaks," said Bill King, athletic trainer.

The Missouri State High School Activities Association also sends out recommendations to school athletic directors.

"If the heat index gets above 105, then we need to take a break from practice. And/or if there is an event that is taking place, then we need to possibly delay the start of that event unitl the temperature goes down or the heat index goes down," said Jesse Wall, Athletic Director.

In the school's quest to keep children safe, they also spend time educating players on how to pay attention to your body and recognize the signs of heat exhaustion.

"We make sure that they realize if they start seeing that they're not sweating, or if they're feeling sick to their stomach, or dizzy, that's a good sign and they're starting to get dehydrated and that they need to start replenishing their fluids," said King. 

So far, it seems the players are paying attention.

"Coaches say go get some Pedialyte. Get some protein after practice," said Seth Towery, football player.

"You got to drink a lot of water. And whenever you think you drink enough, you got to drink more," said Tate Whisman, football player.

Coaches cannot over-stress the importance of drinking something as simple as water. 

Page: [[$index + 1]]
comments powered by Disqus